© 2018 by Blackwater Valley Wind Awareness

Innogy | ​Windfarm Lyre | Innogy Renewables UK | Lyre Windfarm | Lyrenacarriga | Innogy Onshore Wind | Innogy Renewables Ireland |  Waterford | Cork | Coillte | I Am Innogy | Blackwater Wind Aware | Wind Farms | Ireland | Wind Turbines | Waterford Wind Energy Strategy |  Woodhouse | Barnafaddock |  An Bord Pleanla | Blackwater Valley | Planning Guidelines | RWE Energy Wind Farms | Innogy Renewables Wind Farms | Innogy Off Shore Wind Farms UK | RWE Innogy Ireland | Innogy Renewables Ireland Limited | Innogy Solutions Ireland Ltd | Innogy Ireland Jobs | Wind Farms Ireland Facts | Wind Farms Ireland List | Planned Wind Farms Ireland | Wind Farm Companies Ireland | Wind Farms Near Me | Wind Farm Developers | Innogy Consulting | Innogy Kilkenny | Protect Rural Rireland |

New WHO noise guidelines for Europe released

World Health Organisation rules wind turbine noise impacts health and well-being 

wind turbine noise impacts health and well being WHO

 

The just released WHO Environmental Noise Guidelines for the European Region provide strong evidence that noise is one of the top environmental hazards to both physical and mental health and well-being in the European Region.

Officially launched to countries and stakeholders in Basel, Switzerland on 10 October 2018, the document identifies levels at which noise has significant health impacts and recommends actions to reduce exposure. For the first time, a comprehensive and rigorous methodological framework was applied to develop the recommendations.

“Noise pollution in our towns and cities is increasing, blighting the lives of many European citizens. More than a nuisance, excessive noise is a health risk - contributing to cardiovascular diseases, for example. We need to act on the many sources of noise pollution – from motorized vehicles to loud nightclubs and concerts – to protect our health,” says Dr Zsuzsanna Jakab, WHO Regional Director for Europe. “The new WHO guidelines define exposure levels to noise that should not be exceeded to minimize adverse health effects and we urge European policy-makers to make good use of this guidance for the benefit of all Europeans.”

What is new

Compared to previous WHO guidelines on noise, this version contains five significant developments:

  • stronger evidence of the cardiovascular and metabolic effects of environmental noise;

  • inclusion of new noise sources, namely wind turbine noise and leisure noise, in addition to noise from transportation (aircraft, rail and road traffic);

  • use of a standardized approach to assess the evidence;

  • a systematic review of evidence, defining the relationship between noise exposure and risk of adverse health outcomes;

  • use of long-term average noise exposure indicators to better predict adverse health outcomes.

Driving policy action to protect communities from health effects of noise

Targeted at decision-makers and technical experts, the new guidelines aim to support legislation and policy-making at local, national and international level. “Through their potential to influence urban, transport and energy policies, the Environmental Noise Guidelines contribute to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and support our vision of creating resilient communities and supportive environments in the Region,” continues Dr Jakab.

Although the guidelines focus on the European Region and provide guidance consistent with the European Union’s Environmental Noise Directive, they also have global relevance. The large body of evidence underpinning the recommendations was derived not only from noise effect studies in Europe but also from research in other parts of the world, mainly America, Asia and Australia.

Furthermore, the guidelines highlight data and research gaps to be addressed in future studies.

 

An independent peer-reviewed development process

The development process of the current guidelines was conducted by two independent groups of experts from the environmental noise community who adhered to a new, rigorous, evidence-based methodology. Eight peer-reviewed systematic reviews of the pertinent literature underpin the guidelines, incorporating significant research since the publication of the WHO Night Noise Guidelines for Europe in 2009. The systematic reviews were based on several health outcomes – cardiovascular and metabolic effects, annoyance, effects on sleep, cognitive impairment, hearing impairment and tinnitus, adverse birth outcomes, and quality of life, mental health and well-being – and the effectiveness of interventions in reducing noise exposure and negative health impacts.

“These guidelines have been developed based on the growing body of evidence in the field of environmental noise research,” concludes Professor Stephen Stansfeld, Chair of the Guidelines Development Group. “They aim to support public health policy that will protect communities from the adverse effects of noise, as well as stimulate further research into the health effects of different types of noise.”

Proposed Cork wind farm to ‘muddy’ water supply

A proposed wind farm development will have “catastrophic” consequences for a Co Cork town’s public water supply, according to a health and safety expert.

 

Tom Morley, a retired mechanical engineer and a member of the National Examination Board in Occupational Safety and Health (Nebosh), made the observation at a public meeting in Youghal, hosted by Blackwater Valley Wind Aware.

 

The group opposes plans by German energy company Innogy, through its subsidiary Innogy Renewables Ireland Ltd and in partnership with Dublin-based Highfield Energy, to construct 25 wind turbines, 150m tall, on a 3,500-acre site at Lyrenacarriga. The site, in Coillte and private ownership, transects the Cork / Waterford border.

Objectors claim the development will negatively affect 274 homes.

 

Mr Morley warned the project would involve “excavating hundreds of thousands of tons of rock and soil”. He believed the excavations could equate to 40 tons of high tensile reinforcement steel per turbine base, plus over 25,000 tonnes of concrete in total. Over 18,000 tonnes also stand to be extracted for substations and roads.

He said the stockpiled residue would infiltrate underground and overground streams from where water is pumped upwards to an intake filter system at Boola before being dispensed to Youghal’s 8,000-approximate population.

 

The engineer said the local authority would have to dredge blocked intakes and disinfect the water, resulting in Youghal water having a nasty taste and possibly being suspended “for days on end”.

Mr Morley further predicted that pressurisation on underground streams would raise the levels, flood the water basin, and subsequently contaminate private water wells nearby.

 

Waterford County Council was refused planning 18 years ago for a landfill facility in the area amid fears it would seep into underground streams.

 

Blackwater Valley Wind Aware chairman Paddy Massey said when he spoke to Innogy representatives, they “seemed unaware” of the water supply issue.

Meanwhile, Innogy is awaiting an An Bord Pleanála decision on designating the scheme strategic infrastructure development, enabling it to bypass local authority approval and go straight to the board.

 

The company says it is “engaging with many project stakeholders to identify any risks associated with the project, which will take into account all environmental receptors, including water”. It says further meetings with the local community are planned.

The action group is contesting Waterford council’s executive refusal to amend its 2011 development plan to exclude wind farms at Lyrenacarriga.

 

- by Christy Parker, Irish Examiner Sept 24th 2018